Tuesday, 6 June 2017

How to file your work experience on the PMP application

Though some project manager’s dispute the certification’s worth, it does seem to help project managers land project management jobs or at least get their feet through the door. In general, we feel that if you’re a project manager, and you’re interested in continuing your career in project management, it is worth the go ahead. Finish your PMP prep course, apply, take the PMP examination and pass to become a certified Project Management Professional.

One of the most frequent (if not the most frequent) questions I am asked by potential PMP hopefuls is about the PMP examination application process. In particular, project managers would like to know how they should go about filing their work experience: how to document their hours of project management experience, how to report it to PMI, and how to prepare for the dreaded PMI audit, should it occur.

As suggested by one of our senior instructors…

I followed a process of my own devising to file my own project management work experience in preparation for my application to take the PMP exam that seemed to work pretty well. I’ll share it here in case you would like to try it during your own application process.

Recording your PM work experience

In order to apply for the PMP examination, you need to have amassed 4,500 hours of project management work experience. If you do not have a bachelor’s degree, the work experience requirement is greater at 7,500 hours of experience. You need to have completed 36 months (three years) of unique, non-overlapping project management experience, that is to say that if you’ve completed all of your 4,500 hours of project management experience within a 12 month window, that is not sufficient to apply to take the PMP examination.

For each project that you have worked on during your career, you need to document the hours you have spent in each of the five PMI Process Groups listed below:

·      Initiating the Project
·      Planning the Project
·      Executing the Project
·      Monitoring and Controlling the Project
·      Closing the Project

After calculating the hours per Process Group for each project, you will arrive at a total number of project hours for that individual project. Once you have completed tallying your work experience for all of the projects you have worked on, you can then figure out the total hours that you have worked for all of the projects in your career. At this point, if you don’t already know, you will be able to figure out whether or not you have the requirements to apply to take the PMP examination.
To figure this total out, please use an Excel spreadsheet that tally’s up all of your work experience hours per Process Group, per project, that you had worked on in my previous roles. Then use built-in Excel functions to figure out how many hours total that equalled to tally your own project management work experience.

You can download the template here.

Preparation for a possible PMI audit

The next and perhaps most important step you need to take before you submit your PMP application is to prepare yourself in case your application should get audited by the Project Management Institute (PMI). In order to do this, you will want to contact those managers who you have worked for in the past and send them the hours that you have indicated that you worked on projects while under their management in your Excel spreadsheet. You will then ask these managers: Should my application happen to get audited by PMI, would you attest that I worked the hours as indicated on this spreadsheet?

If your managers agree to vouch for the hours you have indicated, then you’re in good shape! Should PMI decide to audit your application, you can simply have your former managers sign off on the hours that you have already passed by them. Any conflicts or disagreements about the hours you have worked while in their employment should have been resolved before you submitted your PMP application.

Some special audit scenarios

There are a few difficult scenarios that you may encounter when preparing for a possible PMI audit. These may include the below:

·      What if your manager no longer works for the company you’ve filed hours for, and nobody at the company can vouch for your hours?
·      What if you worked for your own company and did not report to anyone?
·      What if the projects you worked on were top secret, government or military contracts for which you cannot disclose any information?

In these cases I recommend collecting as much collateral as you can about the projects you’ve worked for in the past – project charters, work breakdown structures, project schedules and the like – to demonstrate to PMI should they ask for it; unless, of course, this information is classified by the companies you’ve worked for. In that case, I should go in armed with the truth – that these hours that you have indicated, you have worked but cannot vouch for, and the reasons that you cannot vouch for them. I am sure that PMI has received many applications from project managers working in military or top-secret organizations who cannot disclose information about the various projects that they have worked on. In that case, I imagine that you can work with PMI to find a way to approve your application without your having to deliver any separate artefacts to prove your experience.

We hope that this article and accompanying spreadsheet will come in handy when it comes time for you or someone you know to file your project management work experience for the PMP application. Good luck with your application, PMP exam preparation, and the exam!

For more info/guidance. Please contact us

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Monday, 5 June 2017

CAPM – the Certified Associate in Project Management.

If you are considering applying to get CAPM certified, you might be wondering whether or not it is worth the time, cost and effort to do so. Let’s look at a few important things one should know about CAPM.

The CAPM is the Project Management Institute (PMI)’s entry level certification for project managers or people who are interested in entering the field of project management. CAPM does not require the project management work experience that the PMP does. The multiple-choice test that candidates must pass in order to become CAPM certified is not as difficult to pass as the PMP exam.

To apply for the CAPM all you need is a secondary education (high school or the equivalent). This means that people who are currently enrolled in college or university and want to have project management certification before they graduate, and can start applying for jobs can get CAPM certified before graduation. This might help these individuals score entry-level project management jobs upon graduation.

Criteria to take the CAPM,

You must have:
ü  A secondary diploma (high school or the global equivalent)
ü  At least 1,500 hours experience OR 23 hours of project management education.

If you study PMI’s framework to take the CAPM exam, you will also be studying the same framework that is needed to pass the more difficult PMP exam. In order to study for either exam, you will need to know PMI’s framework according to the PMBOK. This means that time and effort spent on studying for the CAPM will not be wasted if you also eventually want to become PMP certified.

If you already have a way that you can get those 4,500 hours of professional experience leading and directing projects that you need in order to take the PMP exam, you should wait until you have that experience, then go for your PMP. There is no reason to get the CAPM if you can see a clear path toward getting your PMP.

If you do not have the work experience to attain PMP certification, that certainly does not mean “it’s the CAPM or nothing”. There are numerous other options available to you if you are interested in learning about project management. In fact, many people believe PMI’s framework, which is based on the waterfall methodology of project management, is quite dated and not as effective as other current project management frameworks.

One such option is Scrum Master Certification, where you will learn about Agile Development using Scrum. Agile is a very popular methodology where projects are completed in iterations. Agile has an agreed-upon Agile Manifesto to which Agile project management principles are based. I have used this project management methodology myself and found it both effective and scalable.

The IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) is a set of practices for IT Service Management (ITSM) that offers a wide range of certifications. While these certifications are currently more popular for practitioners in the United Kingdom than they are in the United States or other parts of the world, they are also worth investigating if you are interested in a career in information technology.

For more info/guidance. Please contact us

Website: www.global-teq.com
Email: info@global-teq.com
Phone: +1-214-227-6396

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